November 3rd, 2020 (Tuesday) – Presidential & General Election

Key Websites For Voting Information

New Mexico Secretary of State: Voter information portal (comprehensive, one-stop voting information)

Request an absentee ballot (may be automatically mailed by September 14)

Voter registration (new voters or update your information; requires birthday, driver's license or state ID number, social security number)

Look up your voter information (requires name, birthday, county)

Important dates – 2020 General Election

New Mexico wants every eligible citizen to vote and provides a variety of ways to vote: vote in-person on election day; early voting at select locations; and by mail (absentee ballot). But you must be registered to vote and you should make sure your voting information is up-to-date.

Voter Registration

Qualifications: you must be a US citizen, a resident of New Mexico, and at least 18 years old by November 3. If you are not sure if you are registered or not, check here.

Online registration: Use this portal to update your voter registration or register for the first time in NM. You will need to provide the following information, and it must match what is on record: name, date of birth, social security number, driver's license or state ID. You can register online any time, but it must be completed by October 6 to qualify for the 2020 General Election.

By mail: use the paper application (English Español)  and mail it to your to your County Clerk’s Office.

In-person registration: There is no same-day registration on Election Day in New Mexico. But it is possible to register in person after the October 6 online deadline. This varies from county to county, so check your County Clerk's office.

Vote by mail / Absentee ballot

No excuse is required to request and submit an absentee ballot. However, once you request an absentee ballot, you can no longer vote in person.

Request an Absentee Ballot: Some county clerks will automatically send absentee ballot requests to all registered voters in that county. Check with your County Clerk's Office. The deadline to request an absentee ballot is October 20; however, you should consider possible mail delays. You can also…

If you did not receive your absentee ballot, contact your County Clerk’s Office no later than November 2.

Return your Absentee Ballot: County Clerk's offices will begin mailing absentee ballots on October 6 to those voters who requested them. Once you have requested an absentee ballot, it is no longer an option to vote in person. Be sure to follow all instructions, as improperly sealed ballots or those that lack signatures may be deemed invalid. You can return them in the following ways:

  • Mail it in the envelope provided. The post office recommends you mail the ballot by October 20, which allows 14 days to reach your county clerk's office.
  • Return it a dropbox at your County Clerk's Office or other locations provided by your county.
  • At a dropbox at any polling place (early voting or election day).
  • A caregiver or immediate family may deliver a voter’s absentee ballot in person or by mail.

Check the status of your absentee ballot here.

Early in-person voting

You may vote early in-person at dates and locations determined by your County Clerk. For a list of all voting places, including absentee ballot drop boxes and early voting, enter your information in the Secretary of State's Voter Services page. At this portal, you can also view a sample ballot and check your voting status. The early voting period extends from October 6 - October 31, but varies by location, so please check your County Clerk's Office.

  • Vote at your county clerk’s office beginning October 6
  • Expanded early voting in many counties October 17-31
  • All county clerks provide early in-person voting on October 31
  • Early voting ends the Saturday before the election, October 31

Election day voting – November 3

Regular election-day voting locations are determined by your County Clerk. For a list of all voting places, including absentee ballot drop boxes and early voting, enter your information in the Secretary of State's Voter Services page (and view a sample ballot or check your voting status). You can also drop off un-mailed absentee ballots.

Provisional voting: Provisional ballots are for voters who believe they are registered but their registration can’t be found. You will be issued a provisional ballot if your name does not appear on the roster at your polling place or if you are a first time voter who registered by mail and did not provide the required identification.

Intimidation: If you witness or are a victim of intimidation or discriminatory conduct, you should report it to the Secretary of State's Office.

Additional resources

New Mexico Secretary of State Voter information portal

Common Cause has a set of voter tools if this information does not address your question.

The New Mexico League of Women Voters provides local voting information, including an unbiased election guide.

When We All Vote offers motivation, encouragement, and features Michelle Obama as a co-chair.

John Lewis crossing the Edmund Pettus Bridge from Selma to Montgomery, 1965.

Why are voting rights not just a lawful right, but a privilege?
Why is your right to exercise your vote and make your voice heard vital?

Read Sharon King's article on Pivotal Moments of the Development of the Voting Rights Act.


Recent news for voters

Pivotal Moments of the Development of the Voting Rights Act

Pivotal Moments of the Development of the Voting Rights Act
Why are voting rights not just a lawful right, but a privilege? Why is your right to exercise your vote and make your voice heard vital? ... Read More